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At first glance, it might be difficult to connect the dots between the 125,000 residents of Linn County with the 4,000 people who live in the village of Sakila, Tanzania.

But on any given day, medical staff at the Sakila medical clinic may be wearing scrubs donated by Samaritan Health Services, or reading by lights fed by wiring installed by someone from Lebanon, some 10,000 miles away.

It is just one way the world is shrinking, thanks to Bishop Eliudi Issangya of Sakila and local volunteers associated with the River Center church in Lebanon.

“I was amazed and proud when I saw the medical scrubs from Samaritan,” County Commissioner Will Tucker said of his mission work in Sakila last year.

Tucker called his visit to Sakila “eye opening.”

Tucker said Sakila is so small and rural, it doesn’t show up during a Google Maps search. But thanks to volunteers and financial support from churches in Oregon, Washington and Montana, great things are happening there.

Issangya visited Linn County last week, thanking local sponsors and making connections for further projects in Tanzania. He will spend several weeks visiting his supporting churches in America.

Issangya has spent more than 30 years planting seeds of Christianity in Tanzania, leading to the growth of more than 1,600 churches in five African countries.

He earned a pastoral degree from the San Diego School of Ministry in 1979. In 1983, Issangya said, God told him to start a Bible school in Sakila, where most families earn less than $300 per year.

Families subsist with a cow or two, chickens and by planting corn and beans.

His work has grown to include more than 7,000 pastors, 1,600 churches, a radio station, an orphanage and medical clinics.

There are about 1,000 students in schools from grades kindergarten through 12th.

“To encourage our students to do well, we ask them to pray and to depend on God in everything they do,
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” Issangya said.

The result is that students in the schools’ precollege classes have the highest ranking of all schools in the region.

Tucker said that during his visit, the students were “extremely grateful for everything we brought them. They loved the notebooks and welcomed us with open arms.”

A sponsoring church in Wyoming sent an entire well drilling truck and well casing pipes to the village because water is vital in arid Tanzania.

“Without a city well, children would have to spend hours every day hauling water to their homes from the river. They would not have time to attend school,” Tucker said.

Volunteers from the River Center have installed electrical wiring and provided medical teams at the clinic.

Lynn Koehn, pastor at The River Center, said Issangya purchased a portable sawmill in Portland and shipped it to Sakila so locals could create their own lumber for building projects.

The church also teaches young men and women how to weld and do mechanical work. The bishop’s wife teaches them to cook.

Issangya said life in Tanzania is relatively stable compared to other African countries.

“But, we have had four years of drought and we don’t have much water storage or hydropower,” Issangya said.

Like much of Africa, Sakila is not immune to the effect of AIDS.

“The men leave the villages, go to the city for work and are unfaithful,” Issangya said. “They return to their wives and the disease spreads.”

Bishop Issangya’s visit to Oregon was in part to solicit sponsorships for his orphanage. He said it costs $31 per month to sponsor an orphan’s food, clothing, health care and educational needs.

There are currently 53 orphans being take care of and Issangya would like to expand that to 80.

Issangya also has a “wish list” of needs for his village: $450 will help freshen up gravel walkways; $2,000 will upgrade the administration building; solar lights for homes, $12 each; new shoes, $20.

The high school could use a 100,000 gallon water storage tank, $15,000; expansion of the girls’ dormitory, two wings at $27,000 each; a small pickup truck; underground wiring for outside lighting; and 25 16 foot pressure treated 4 by 4s.
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PT Oct. PT Oct. 30, 2017

Stephen Curry’s own Under Armour Curry 3 Basketball shoes worn and autographed by Stephen Curry from the Golden State Warriors. Shoes include his initials WSC (Wardell Stephen Curry, II), his autograph, Romans 8:28 and the quote “I can do all things.”(Photo: Laura Peters/The News Leader)STAUNTON A pair of Stephen “Steph” Curry autographed shoes will be auctioned off this week during the Valley Mission’s fifth annual Just Jazzin’ Benefit. at Gypsy Hill Place,is vital to the Mission’s programming.

Funds raised during the event gives the missionthe opportunity to provide its clients the tools they need to become self sustaining members of the community, according toSusan Richardson, executive director of the Valley Mission.

“Funding from our annual Just Jazzin’event plays an important part in the financial support of our shelter’s impactful programs and services each year,” Richardsonsaid.

Stephen Curry’s own Under Armour Curry 3 Basketball shoes worn and autographed by Stephen Curry from the Golden State Warriors. Shoes include his initials WSC (Wardell Stephen Curry, II), his autograph, Romans 8:28 and the quote “I can do all things.” (Photo: Laura Peters/The News Leader)

“We at Valley Mission are delighted by Stephen’s generous gift to usand we were even more inspired when we saw the Romans 8:28 notation,” Richardson said.”This is a Bible verse that means so much to those of us who are using our lives to spread God’s love to members of our community who are experiencing unimaginable hardships.”

The Romans 8:28 verse:

“And we know that in all things God works for the goodof those who love him, whohave been calledaccording to his purpose.”

There are 91 residents at Valley Mission, 17 of whom are children, Richardson said.

In 2016, the Valley Mission cared for 649 individuals 109 children and 540 adults for a total of 26,140 nights in its 125 bed facility. A total of 54,647 free meals were provided to shelter residents and community members in the Mission’sdining hall in 2016, and 141 emergency food boxes were distributed.

The Valley Mission offers case management services,
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pastoral counseling, mental health and substance abuse counseling, computer tutoring of adults in our computer lab, homework help to school aged children, nutritional educationand more, Richardson said.

Since 1971 the Valley Mission has provided shelter, support, hope and God’s love to the homeless, Richardson said. Basic needs of shelter, food, clothing and spiritual encouragement are provided to all.

Stephen Curry’s own Under Armour Curry 3 Basketball shoes worn and autographed by Stephen Curry from the Golden State Warriors. Shoes include his initials WSC (Wardell Stephen Curry, II), his autograph, Romans 8:28 and the quote “I can do all things.” (Photo: Laura Peters/The News Leader)

“This is a wonderful event, truly an inspiring celebration. We’re blessed to have so many wonderful individuals sharing their time, talents and resources with the Valley Mission. Phenomenal musicians, caterers, and contributors are working to make this event possible,”said Greg Beam, director of marketing and development for the Valley Mission.

“We are eager for attendees to see the quality of the items we have available during our silent auction portion of the evening. This will not be your typical silent auction.

Stephen Curry’s own Under Armour Curry 3 Basketball shoes worn and autographed by Stephen Curry from the Golden State Warriors.
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HOLTON It may not have seemed that way at the time, but it was exactly what Jackson Heights needed.

After cruising past their first three foes, the Cobras not only found itself in a dog fight with Maur Hill in week four, but staring at the distinct possibility of suffering their first loss. Down 14 8 in the fourth quarter after the Ravens scored with about eight and a half minutes left, Heights mustered a response and got a late touchdown run and two point conversion from senior back Brady Holliday to pull out a 16 14 victory.

“That Maur Hill game was the best thing for us,” Heights coach Caleb Wick said. “That game really opened up our eyes and it gave us a lot of confidence. Maur Hill a very good team and to be able to drive down on them and win, it was really big for us.”

The victory was a much needed boost for Heights just before the start of Class 2 1A District 2 play. Grouped in arguably the toughest district in 2 1A, Heights (6 0) has a grind it out win to fall back on as it prepares for what could be its biggest test of the season Friday night when fellow unbeaten and No. 5 Valley Heights comes to town.

In some regards, Valley Heights coach Tony Trimble wishes he had the same luxury. The Mustangs have yet to be tested during their 6 0 start with their closest margin of victory a 30 point win over Wabaunsee two weeks ago.

And while Trimble would like to think his team is ready for the rigors of the final three weeks, well, he doesn know for sure.

“I not sure where we at really, to be honest with you,” Trimble said. “Everybody wants to be 6 0 at this point, so we glad that where we at. We earned the right to be 6 0 for sure, but at the same time, we really not sure where we at.

“That what we been talking to our kids about, that these type of games are what football all about. This is why we play the games, why I coach the game. This is the kind of game we want to play.”

Friday game is not only important as a true measuring stick for both programs, but also has a bit of a must win feel to it. Each has yet to face Centralia in district play and though the Panthers are 4 2, both Trimble and Wick are fully aware of Centralia schedule and tradition and the challenge the Panthers will pose.

A win on Friday provides at least some margin of error in the final two games. A loss and beating Centralia will be imperative to earn a playoff berth.

“Centralia record isn the same as Jackson Heights and ours, but if I had to sit down and predict a finish to the district, Centralia the team to beat at this point in time,” Trimble said. “Just from the way they played and performed against those bigger schools (3A unbeatens Nemaha Central and Sabetha). They a very talented football team who is coached very well. Their kids know how to win and have a culture of success and have high expectations and live up to them most of the time. Definitely this is the big game for both of us.”

Not only do the two school share a similar moniker with Heights in the school name, but they also share a similar approach on the gridiron. Namely, it two teams that like to line up and smash mouth their way offensively, eschewing the passing game for a run dominated attack.

Both have done it extremely well this year with plenty of new personnel in the backfield handling the load.

Jackson Heights returned Holliday to the backfield after he ran for close to 1,000 yards a year ago, but his surrounding cast was entirely new. Holliday has once again been the workhorse, rushing for 856 yards, but newcomers Sebastian Butto (492 yards, 8.5 yards per carry) and Cooper Williams (217 yards) have emerged as solid complements with Williams settling in at quarterback as a sophomore.

“After Brady, we did have some big question marks,” Wick said. “Sebastian, we didn know what we would get from him but he sort of exploded onto the scene. And Cooper, he played a little as a freshman at running back, but we didn have many viable options at quarterback and he sort of taken the reins. He really formulated the offense the way we want it and I think Maur Hill was a big game for him. It showed a lot of maturity for him to take us down for the win in that game.”

Valley Heights, meanwhile, brought back senior fullback Jordan Yungeberg after he ran for 913 yards a year ago as well, but had to replace All 2 1A back Hunter Stevenson (1,662 yards) and saw projected starting quarterback Bryan Yungeberg broke his thumb two days before the opener and another potential back, sophomore Trey Martin, transfer.

Sophomore Cameron Beardsley has filled in well at quarterback, but the pleasant surprise for the Mustangs has been the emergence of sophomore back Cole Coggins. Stepping into Stevenson shoes, Coggins has done a pretty good impression and has 989 yards and 15 touchdowns through six games.

“You talk about being a surprise, it was to us,” Trimble said. “We knew Cole had some ability and talent, but quite honestly until our first game I didn know he could do what he doing for us. We had a very good freshman (Martin) that played a lot for us last year and Cole was always kind of in his shadow. When he moved away, I think that allowed Cole to shine a little more and show us what he could do.”

Yungeberg has added 745 yards and 16 touchdowns on the ground and as a team, Valley Heights has rushed for 2,392 yards. Jackson Heights has run for 2,045.

The difference Friday could come down to the battle up front and going into the season, both coaches felt that was their team biggest strength returning almost every starter. Valley Heights is upperclassmen heavy up front led by returning all leaguer Dalton Joseph and tight end Harrison Blaske.

Jackson Heights has had to adjust on the fly, however, losing junior Curtis Niehues before the opener to a torn labrum and sophomore Riley Watkins for the bulk of the season with nerve damage in his back. The Cobras have started two freshmen on the line most of the season.

“They still young and we still going through bumps in the road,” Wick said. “But they grown up and gained a lot of confidence.”

Valley Heights won last year contest 26 22, a victory that propelled the Mustangs to the playoffs and relegated Jackson Heights to postseason onlookers despite a 6 3 overall record. It was the second time in four years the Cobras won at least six games yet missed the playoffs.

“It on our minds for sure,” Wick said. “When you go 6 3 and don make the playoffs, it a gut wrenching feeling because you know you would compete. The kids are hungry for sure.”
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MISSION Subtropical and tropical fruit decorations rained over the city Saturday kicking off this years Texas Citrus Fiesta festivities.

As part of the annual celebration, the community center was host to the Product Costume Show, Shoebox Float Competition and the Ultimate Grapefruit Pie Baking Showdown.

As one of the oldest celebrations in the Rio Grande Valley, the Texas Citrus committee chooses yearly themes to give a twist to the competitions while also giving participants room to expand on the theme.

The 2018 theme is “Hawaiian Pirate Adventures.”

Those who compete in the Product Costume Show must begin preparations months in advance of the competition.

Joann Ortiz, co chair for the Product Costume Show, explained the contestants must design their own outfits, including apparel, accessories and shoes.

They (costume participants) go all around the Valley and theyll pick up oranges that have fallen or some of them will have their own orange trees or bougainvilleas,” Ortiz said. “Theyll pick them up also and start drying them very early with a dehydrator or out in the sun.

Gathering of materials usually begins in October and sometimes it continues up to the final days. “They start working on their outfits and some of them are ready by the first of January while others are in just before the event day, Oritz said.

All the citrus used in the costumes has to be grown and picked in the Valley. Some of the participants just dehydrated the fruit and placed it on cloth, while others cut and ground the fruit to make powders of orange and grapefruit peel.

Both of Mission resident Dalia Vivian’s children participated in the competition. Her daughter entered in the Product Costume Show as “Little Hawaiian Tourist,” with her son contributing to the hat design.

I got into this because my sisters were involved in this and their daughters would do this, Vivian said.

The first year, she recalled, she was lost going in to the competition. But after inquiring with the citrus fiesta office, she got the hang of things and that year her daughter won first place.

She has white onion, purple onion; all the green is from orange, lemon, lime and grapefruit (tree leaves), Vivian said, describing her daughters outfit.

Another contestant was Mission resident Sara Young, who has participated in the Texas Citrus Fiesta contests for several years.

When I was younger, I think I did it four times I did costumes, Young said. This year I wanted to be involved some way, so I did a hat.

Her hat was decorated with lemon slices, citrus peel and leaves, with additional citrus pieces topped with a pineapple stem.

Not all of the fruit on display was decorative.

Before the Costume Product Show began, eight bakers entered the Grapefruit Pie Baking Showdown. The grapefruit pies ranged from traditional to unique, but all were required to highlight the sweetness of the Valley citrus.

Local students also had the opportunity get in on the celebration of citrus.

Fourth and fifth grade students from the Mission, Sharyland and La Joya school districts were tasked with making mini floats using a shoebox. Using all their creativity to carry out this year’s Hawaiian pirate theme, the students decorated the shoeboxes with fabric topped with citrus products such slices, peels and powders.
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THERE A LIST of reasons why Jon Gray looks years younger than his real age: a job that lets him meet his daughters at the school bus every day, a lineup of customers, a cosy shop with a wood stove and a commute of 15 metres.

Except for Indian spices, for which he occasionally travels to Halifax, Gray, a shoemaker and one of the most contented people you ever meet, has everything he needs in Annapolis Royal.

“We used to live in the country, in Port Royal, but I in the fire department and I was always the last one on the truck,” said Gray, 37. “My wife wasn convinced that was a good enough reason to move to town, but eventually I won her over.”

Gray advises visitors not to show up at his shop until mid morning, after the stove has taken off the chill. The converted garage with a rough hewn wooden floor and the pleasing aroma of leather has a neatly hanging array of tools with names like bone folder, pegging awl, channel knife and lasting pliers.

Gray doing the job that fascinated him since he was a boy.

“What led to me becoming a shoemaker is when I was a child I visited a shoe shop with my father, and something about the smell of the shoe shop, the leather, the look of the old tools . . . there something inherently attractive about these old tools,” he said. “And watching the craftsman make shoes, it could easily have been something I just ignored in my life, but for some reason it just stuck.”

During high school in Ontario, Gray swept the floors in an orthopedic shoe shop for a couple of years, spending time after the shop had closed learning how to make things out of leather. After graduation, the shop owner took him on as an apprentice.

“I was exposed to the work of hand sewn shoes by an older gentleman who worked at the shop when I first started, and something about what he did was particularly interesting to me,” said Gray. “Then when I saw the look of shoes made by modern shoemakers using those traditional techniques, I was blown away.

“I came out to Annapolis Royal to work in a theatrical shoe shop. In Granville Ferry,
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there a gentleman there who makes shoes for plays and operas and movies. I wanted to learn how to make shoes with some style, and I thought I was going to spend a summer here working with him, and it turned out to be nine years.”

The shoes Gray turns out are so beautiful, it enough to make you consider getting a job that requires a suit just so you could wear the shoes. Of course, it would have to be a fairly well paying job, and you couldn be in a hurry.

“Right now, it about six to eight months to finish an order,” Gray said.

“For a first pair, there a $150 charge for creating the last, and the last is the form that looks like a foot, and the shoes are moulded around the last. Once I have that last made, I make a fitting model, which is a rough version of the shoe using less expensive materials and a cork sole.

“I try that on to make sure that when we invest the expensive materials and the time that the shoe is going to fit them. The shoes themselves are a thousand dollars.”

About two thirds of his customers are men, and typically they come to his shop three times for fittings while the shoes are being crafted. Halifax is his single biggest market, but Gray can do fittings via Skype, and he ships shoes all over the world.

“Often, customers will come to me with an image in their mind of the kind of shoe they want. Sometimes they seen my work and there a shoe that they particularly interested in, sometimes they have pictures they pulled out of magazines or newspapers, sometimes there sketches.

“When I first opened up, I was taking some business classes and . . . they ask you to define who you think your customers are going to be. I had it in my head that it would be the people with money.

“Not to say that my customers don have money, because you need to have a certain disposable income to spend a thousand dollars on a pair of shoes, but it not just the doctors, the lawyers, the business executives that I have.

“I have people who are interested in (the) craft, who are patrons of the arts, that are my customers. It so much broader a demographic that comes to me than I ever suspected.

“The best thing about my job is that I spend my days making a product that I think is beautiful and useful and comfortable, and at the same time I a steward of this craft.
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Six Valley celebrities will don their dancing shoes as they compete for the chance to win $1,000 for the charity of their choice at the Youngstown Warren Regional Chamber and Down Syndrome Association of the Valley’s annual Black and White Gala on Oct. 17, in partnership with Fred Astaire Dance Studio.

Danielle Cantrell, vice president retail/retail banking manager for Cortland Banks; Chris Jaskiewicz, president and founder of Hopestar, LLC; Claudia Kovach, vice president of City Machine Technologies Inc.; Troy Loney, co owner of Youngstown Phantoms Hockey; Michelle Nicks, news reporter for WFMJ TV 21;
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and Phill Reda, owner of Magic Tree Pub Eatery, will be paired with professional dancers courtesy of Fred Astaire Dance Studio for a “Dancing With the Stars” style competition.

The winner, judged by audience members and a panel of professional judges, will claim the Mirror Ball Trophy and the $1,000 donation to his or her charity.

October marks the 30th anniversary of “Back to the Future,” the classic sci fi comedy starring Michael J. Fox and Christopher Lloyd. Music from the series will be featured throughout the evening.

Those attending are asked to wear black or white cocktail or formal attire.

Reservations are required by Tuesday. Tickets are $75. For $125, guests can be event patrons, receiving preferred seating in the auditorium during the dancing competition, access to the VIP reception and program recognition. Tables of eight may be purchased with a $1,000 table sponsorship, which includes preferred seating in the auditorium during the dancing competition, access to the VIP reception and program recognition.
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The program uses medications that eliminate the virus from the body completely in most cases.

“It is amazing to cure a person of a deadly disease with a simple pill. There is nothing like it in medicine,” says Dr. Charles Krasner, an infectious disease specialist with the VA Medical Center in Reno.

The VA Medical System is the largest treatment provider of Hepatitis C in the country. The system has been involved in the testing of effective Hepatitis C medications for several years. And now with additional financing and competition, they can treat six patients for what it costs to treat four.

An initial blood test is needed to see if you have the disease more blood work may be needed to confirm the diagnosis. However,
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if the test is positive, veterans can qualify for treatment that so far in Reno has cured 167 patients.

Veterans can get a free blood test to detect Hepatitis C every Friday this summer at the VA Medical Center in Reno, beginning June 10, from 9:00 11:00 am in the primary care area of the hospital.
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(CNN) Parkland, Florida may be more than 2,500 miles away from Salt Lake City, Utah, but the Florida school shooting was close to the mind of NBA player Donovan Mitchell. Or more accurately, his feet.

Mitchell, a guard for the Utah Jazz, wore bright, yellow shoes during his team game Wednesday night against the Phoenix Suns that both called for a stop to gun violence and asked for prayers. Written in black on the side of one shoe was “End Gun Violence.” On the other shoe was written “Pray for Parkland.”

nothing being done native of Connecticut, Mitchell told reporters when he heard about the shooting at Parkland Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that killed 17 people he thought about the 2012 school shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Connecticut.

“My mom a schoolteacher. I was about 15, 20 minutes away during the Sandy Hook shooting. It kind of scary,” said Mitchell, a candidate for the NBA Rookie of the Year. “I not saying all shootings make me feel the same way, but especially school shootings, with my mom being a nursery teacher, it kind of scary that that could happen at any moment, anywhere.”

Twenty children and six adults were killed at Sandy Hook in December 2012 by 20 year old Adam Lanza, who had earlier killed his mother, Nancy Lanza, in their home.

Mitchell said he was praying for the families of the victims in the Florida shooting and feels the nation needed to do more to stop the violence.

“A lot of people, we talk about it, and there a lot of so called awareness of it, but there nothing being done,” he said. “I looked something up, and the same gun that was used in Vegas, Orlando, Sandy Hook, and I missing more. It interesting how it just continues to happen, and the movement doesn do much.”
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Most wireless phones and devices have a setting that allows you to turn off all network connections. This might be called “Airplane Mode,” “Flight Mode,” or there might be an option to “turn off all connections.” When this mode is on, your phone can’t make or receive calls or text messages, or access data services such as email or the Internet. Most phones will still be able to connect to Bluetooth devices and Wi Fi networks when in airplane mode.

For instructions on how to turn airplane mode on or off on your phone or tablet, check the user manual for your model. See:

You can turn on airplane mode to reduce the amount of power your phone is using. If your battery is running low, you can turn on airplane mode to make it last a bit longer (but you won’t be able to make or receive calls or text messages, or use any data services).

If you’re in an area with low or no cellular coverage, your phone can quickly use up its charge searching for a signal. You can turn on airplane mode in areas with weak or no coverage to prevent this from happening.
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